Tag: television

Over the Garden Wall: The Thrill of the Unknown

An interesting format of tale to tell in the medium of television is that of the miniseries. Though often referred to as “limited series” these days, the miniseries offers the chance to tell a large story without being chained down to the constraints of a full season’s expectations. Interestingly, there is something to notice: very rarely are there any animated miniseries. Most often, the miniseries tends to be a live-action production, usually based on a major topic and often with a sweeping scope. One would think that animation could be a strong method for presenting a miniseries, but unfortunately it has gone neglected. At least, until Patrick McHale finally made such a work. First serving as a writer and storyboard artist on The Marvelous Misadventures of Flapjack and then a creative director in the smash hit series Adventure Time, McHale went on to make an animated short film called Tome of the Unknown. It is from this short film that he would develop a ten-episode miniseries known as Over the Garden Wall. First airing on Cartoon Network, this miniseries take advantage of the format to unpack a tale of mystery and heart, while offering a wonderful visual style thanks to its animation.

On a dark and foreboding night, a pair of brothers named Wirt and Greg find themselves lost in a realm known as the Unknown. Though Greg is as cheery and kind as ever, Wirt is concerned about their state and wants to find their way out of the Unknown as soon as possible. However, that is a task easier said than done. The Unknown is a mysterious realm, full of mystery and magic and populated with a variety of odd characters. Though they find themselves an ally in the form of Beatrice, a young girl cursed to become a bluebird, most of the citizens they encounter seem perplexing and sometimes threatening. Most prominent of these figures they encounter is an ominous woodsman, who is obsessed with keeping his lantern lit. He warns them about a creature lurking in the Unknown, a shadowy figure known simply as the Beast. He seeks out those who are lost and have lost hope, turning them into trees that populate the Unknown and provide him with fuel. It is this creature that hunts down Wirt and Greg, adding a greater danger as they seek out a way to escape the Unknown.

Over the Garden Wall is a wonderful animated miniseries. Part of that appeal comes in the mood that pervades throughout the ten-episode run. Over the course of the ten episodes, there is a sense of wonder and playfulness that is also tempered by a sense of the Gothic and morbid. It recalls the feeling of old fairy tales such as those of the Brothers Grimm, offering enchantment and chills with each turn. Of course, classical fairy tales are not the only influence at play in the series. There is also influence from works like Fleischer Brothers cartoons and the stories of Edgar Allan Poe. These disparate influences come together also with the show’s design aesthetic, which pulls from a variety of time periods. From tavern guests who would fit within the Colonial Era to riverboat-riding frogs dressed from the Edwardian Era, the variety of designs mix together in a way that gives a timeless feel to the Unknown. That atmosphere and design, in conjunction with the miniseries’s good writing, really capture the sort of fairy tale sensation which had influenced the project. More than that, all of these pieces work well in tandem with the choice to make this project a miniseries instead of a movie or full series.

Over the course of the ten episodes, the miniseries unpacks its mystery and themes with care. Though the events that Wirt and Greg go through might seem firmly episodic in form, they are united by a recurring theme. Namely, the danger of living in fear and going for an easy solution instead of directly confronting a problem. It is this theme that actually helps it to stand out somewhat in terms of the miniseries format. Oftentimes, a television miniseries will have a big topic as its subject. For instance, Roots had explored the horrors of slavery, V offered an allegory on the rise of Nazism through the lens of an alien invasion, and The Men Who Built America examined how powerful businessmen like Cornelius Vanderbilt and Andrew Carnegie made their impact on American history. Essentially, these miniseries take these sweeping subjects and carve a specific narrative to explore them. Over the Garden Wall takes a different approach. Instead of going for a massive topic, it instead turns inward for a personal core. The concerns about living in fear, of facing the choice between an easy solution and the right one, are concerns that are familiar to us all. That intimate heart, as presented through the careful structure and unfolding mystery in ten episodes, allows this animated miniseries to shine bright as a charming gem.

The image conjured by the term “miniseries” is often that of a live-action production, tackling a huge topic or story over the course of its episode. Over the Garden Wall stands out thanks to its divergence from that, presenting its story not just in a lovely animated form but also by focusing on a more personal theme.

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Neo Yokio: Class Conflict and Shattered Satire

Comedy is something that does not just have to make us laugh. When properly used, comedy can be a tool that sheds light on problems, whether in another work or in the world. Two forms of comedy that fit into this school of thought are parody and satire. Parody is about sending up another work through an ironic fashion, while satire is about holding flaws up for ridicule in the hope of inspiring others to be better. In both cases, they are about taking the components of something (tired tropes in the case of the former, social vices in the case of the latter) and using them as tools of mockery. Ezra Koenig, lead singer of the indie rock band Vampire Weekend, has attempted to employ these methods for a joint Japanese-American anime on Netflix known as Neo Yokio. Within the series, he attempts to parody anime by playing around with familiar tropes as a vehicle for satirizing the upper class and issues of class conflict. Unfortunately, the result is a six-episode series that wavers in how it wants to tell its story, falling apart in the process.

The City of Neo Yokio stands as a shining example of success and culture. Of course, when a city becomes so powerful and influential, it is only natural that enemies would arise to bring it down. In this case, demons seek to tear the city apart, seeing it as a symbol of greed and decadence. Standing guard against such evils are a collection of people known as Magistocrats, rich descendants of the original wizards and witches brought over to defend the city. Among this class of citizen is Kaz Kaan, a skilled demon slayer and one of Neo Yokio’s most eligible bachelors. Unfortunately, he has no real interest in working as a demon slayer. Despite his stern Aunt Agatha’s insistence, Kaz would rather deal in fashion and lay about in luxury rather than work. In fact, his main aim is to win out over Arcangelo Corelli, a member of the old money that mocks Kaz for being “neo riche” and for having to actually work for his cash. Still, the job of a demon slayer must be done to maintain the city’s splendor. In fact, the work seems more important than ever when a demonic possession causes fashion blogger Helena St. Tesero to drop from the fashion world and set out to cast a light on the city’s darkness.

While the show generally falters in its execution, there are still a few strong points. For instance, the show’s side characters have some fun personality to them that is delivered by good talent, such as Jude Law as Kaz’s mecha-butler Charles or Jason Schwartzman as the snobbish Arcangelo Corelli. There is also a strong sense of an interesting and developed setting, with hints that suggest an interesting alternate universe in which Neo Yokio resides (such as Japan and Italy apparently united as one nation named “Giaponne”). However, the satirical goal behind the show falls flat in its execution. In terms of being a parody of anime, its approach is weak-willed. It attempts to play with tropes like nosebleeds and sudden chibification (rendering a character with a more cutesy, cartoonish appearance), but these uses are rare and the tropes themselves have already largely fallen by the wayside in most modern anime. More than just those misfired attempts at anime tropes is a far bigger issue at play. Namely, the show’s attempts to satirize the flaws of upper-class perceptions flounder in their execution.

Over the course of its six half-hour episodes, it is clear that greed and vanity are two major follies that Neo Yokio wishes to satirize. However, the attempts to mock these points become muddled in how the show operates. For one, Kaz Kaan is presented as a symbol of that decadence and celebrity obsession, wallowing in his own melancholy despite living the good life as ordinary citizens sing his praises. While those close to him do call out his shallow and selfish behaviors, others who indulge similar attitudes (like his best friends Lexy and Gottlieb) are treated as normal and let off the hook. Later, the show attempts to delve into more serious issues of class warfare, but that is stymied by how little the poorer denizens of Neo Yokio are actually shown. It feels as if they are only seen for a part of the last episode. Honestly, there is more focus on class warfare among the upper class between old money and “neo riche” than there is between the rich and the poor. When it attempts to do this more meaningful class struggle, it is too little, too late. It is a shame, really. There is a solid idea for a series at this show’s core. Unfortunately, the writing fails to commit fully to its message and the six half-hour episode format is too short to fully realize the story they wanted to tell.

Thoughout the year, satire has been a school of comedy that has produced plenty of great works that aim to inspire improvement in humanity. Neo Yokio is not an example of those good works, as its attempt to offer a message satirizing greed and class warfare is muddled in how it presents that message.

Roald Dahl: Macabre Sensibilities, for Young and Old

Plenty of children’s stories tend to be thought of as light and fun. In truth, they are not all fun and games. There is normally some darkness that lurks within these stories, darkness that helps to make the light and its messages shine brighter. Even the stories collected by the Brothers Grimm, regarded as some of the original tellers of children’s stories, contain plenty of mentions of cruelty and violence. Now, some might feel that this could be too intense for children, that these should be scrubbed clean according to a certain set of standards. In truth, there is a certain value in not talking down to children about this. One such author who understood this was Roald Dahl. His stories for children, remembered for whimsical touches and adapted in plenty of media, also possess plenty of darker elements. Perhaps it might be worth looking at what inspires an author to not shy away from these darker elements.

Born on September 13th, 1916 in the town of Cardiff, Roald Dahl was the son of Norwegian parents. When his sister and father had both died when he was three, his mother had the choice to remain in Wales after their passing, even when she had the option to return to Norway. Dahl first began the life of a schoolboy at the Cathedral School in the district of Llandarff. It was that time that he and his friends had gotten into trouble for putting a dead mouse into a jar of gobstoppers (also known as jawbreakers) owned by Mrs. Pratchett, a local sweetshop owner who was mean to the boys. He would go on to be transferred to St. Peter’s boarding school, where he and other students endured a fierce faculty. However, the school which would be a pivotal place to Dahl was Repton School in Derbyshire. Beginning his time there at age 13, he endured cruel treatment at the hands of both students and teachers. From the brutal corporal punishment he suffered and witnessed dealt out by the teachers to the demeaning work of having to serve senior students, Dahl’s experiences there would develop a definite cynicism in him about humanity. His main joy in that time were the candies and chocolates that the chocolate company Cadbury would send to the school for students to test.

As Roald Dahl got older and World War II began to roll in, he would come to join in the Royal Air Force as a pilot. Among the many missions that he flew in, one flight would bring him to Libya. Having trouble finding the airstrip as night approached, He was forced to make a landing in the desert. The result was a crash, one that landed him in the hospital with a fractured skull and blindness. Eventually, he would regain his sight and continued to serve as a pilot, until he was grounded for suffering from a series of headaches serious enough to cause blackouts. After that, he was made an attache to serve in the British Embassy in Washington D.C. From there, he would come to serve in the intelligence division alongside such noted officers as David Ogilvy and Ian Fleming (best known as the creator of James Bond). During this time, Dahl would come to meet the famed novelist C. S. Forester. Forester had been approached by The Saturday Evening Post with writing a story, and he in turn wanted to write a story about Dahl’s experiences as a pilot. Dahl wrote and compiled a number of anecdotes from that time, then provided them to Forester to work from. Instead, Forester provided the story exactly as Dahl wrote it. Thus was born Roald Dahl’s first story, “A Piece of Cake”, which The Saturday Evening Post had published as “Shot Down Over Libya” in order to have a more exciting title. It was also the story that would go on to launch Roald Dahl’s writing career.

Before he became renowned as a writer of children’s stories, Roald Dahl first began as an author for adults. Most of his early work came in the form of short stories. Plenty of these stories concerned deadly gambles, acts of revenge, and bitter spouses. Most of all, they frequently came with endings that served as a macabre punch line to the proceedings. There is no doubt that Dahl’s more cynical view of humanity comes through in stories like “Lamb to the Slaughter”, about a wife who murders her husband with a frozen leg of lamb and tries to cover up the deed, or “Parson’s Pleasure”, about a deceitful antiques dealer who poses as a clergyman for his cheats. However, it is actually his children’s novels where Dahl really cranks up this cynical attitude. While a few stories concern monsters like witches or giants, nearly all of the villains in his children’s novels are rotten, vile adults.

Sometimes they may lord their wealth over others, sometimes they may be verbally abusive to those they see as weaker or lesser, and sometimes they may simply be sadistic with physical cruelty. In any case, these parents are the sort of commonplace evils of which even children are familiar. As dark and imposing as such cruelty may seem, Dahl balances things out with how he presents goodness. The children that serve as the heroes in his stories are not generally portrayed as extraordinary. In fact, they frequently are presented as rather average. Instead, they possess an innate goodness, recognizing the wickedness around them and rising above it. In that way, Dahl offers a way to challenge and overcome the commonplace evil in their own lives. He also delivers it in a more playful, slightly morbid manner than the squeaky-cleaned stories that some believe children should be given. The result is a more naturalistic approach to teaching children about the cruelty of the world and preparing them for it, treating them with respect and understanding they can grasp it without being directly moralized.

For those who have never read any of Roald Dahl’s stories, there are two avenue I might offer, depending on if you wish to try his adult work or his children’s stories. For those who wish to explore his more adult-oriented work, Tales of the Unexpected is an anthology that collects some of his yarns of the macabre. With such stories as “Lamb to the Slaughter”, “The Man Down South”, and “Mrs. Bixby and the Colonel’s Coat”, this collection will help to show how Dahl’s writing career was launched thanks to his clever writing. As for his work for children, the best example I would guide new readers to would be Matilda. Centered around an intelligent and kind-hearted girl named Matilda and her challenges overcoming her obnoxious parents and a cruel headmistress named Agatha Trunchbull, this novel stands to me as a great example of the kind of whimsical yet morbid stories that he crafted for children.

GLOW: Grappling with the Glass Ceiling

Back in the 1980s, wrestling dominated on the airwaves with the excitement from the WWF (these days known as WWE). Fans watched as big personalities like Hulk Hogan, “Nature Boy” Ric Flair, and “Macho Man” Randy Savage would take to the ring and battle it out. However, there was one outlet that promised something different. This was a group known as GLOW, or Glorious Ladies of Wrestling. Created by David B. McLane, GLOW ran from 1986 through 1990. It featured plenty of high-flying wrestling matches, along with some comedy sketches for a bit of added fun and an off-color attitude to stand apart from the Reagan-Era wholesomeness. The bigger feature, however, were the wrestlers. All of them were women, made up of actresses and stuntwomen who were looking for their big break in a field that barely gave them any. For them, this was their chance in the spotlight, a big thing considering how women’s wrestling was for the longest time viewed as nothing more than a sideshow. It is this outlet which had caught the attention Liz Flahive and Carly Mensch, creators of the hit Netflix series Orange is the New Black. Seeing the potential in crafting a tale about a fictionalized version of the wrestling group, their new Netflix series GLOW serves as an effective look inside the world of wrestling and of women struggling to break out of the restrictive mold.

In the city of Los Angeles in 1985, Ruth Wilder is desperate for her break. She spends day after day going to auditions for minor bit roles, then goes to a scene study workshop where even the other students are bored. For all of her work, she is stuck in a dinky little apartment with barely any cash in her bank account. Then, she gets her opportunity when she is informed about an audition for “offbeat women”. This audition, it turns out, is for the Glorious Ladies of Wrestling, led by skeezy B-movie director Sam Sylvia and rich manchild Sebastian Howard. Amid the tensions over just how to present this new wrestling show, Ruth and the other women (such as the serious-minded stuntwoman Cherry Bang and kind-hearted Carmen Wade) see this as their opportunity to make something of their own. However, there is an additional wrench in the works. Brought in to be the show’s star face is Debbie Eagen, a former best friend of Ruth who now hates Ruth for sleeping with her husband. Now, they must deal with their tension as they fight to make something of this shot, that tension being fodder to Sam as the makings of a great in-ring rivalry.

As their follow-up creation to Orange is the New Black, Flahive and Mensch have a wonderful to series on their hands. The show expertly weaves its way through comedy and drama, relishing in the fun of developing its big spectacle world of wrestling while looking at the grit in the lives of its performers and creators. The series is well-acted, with a cast that is ready to deliver. Alison Brie, for instance, works well in capturing the well-rounded nature of Ruth Wilder. She displays her desperation, playing her with an exhaustion in her form but a spark in her eyes that lights up at the merest performing opprtunity. Marc Maron also works well as Sam Sylvia, delivering all the rough edges of a filmmaker who justifies his vulgar and sleazy B-movies with artistic pretensions and wears his sexism on his sleeve. Even as he has his moments when he recognizes his own dickish behavior and tries to act better than that, he serves as a sort of reminder of the hurdles that these women find themselves facing.

For a lot of the women in this series, the struggle to have something of their own is all too real. For instance, Ruth’s attempts in auditions have her purposefully misreading a man’s part in a desperate play to be notice, only to find it already given to someone else. For Debbie, she finds herself trapped in her marriage, as her husband tries to mend things but from a viewpoint concerning himself and finding herself without a home if she tries to go for a divorce. Even a chance with GLOW has hurdles of its own, with Howard and Sylvia’s guiding practice of stereotypes for their wrestlers. This is particularly a problem for women like Arthie Premkumar and Jenny Chey, whose respective wrestling personas as Beirut the Mad Bomber and Fortune Cookie are all wrapped up in negative racial stereotypes. Still, even as this chance possesses shades of exploitation, this is their shot. As these women practice their moves and develop their wrestling personas, there is a satisfaction in watching them be able to create for once. Whether or not this chance in wrestling is truly empowering or merely exploitative, this is still a chance where these women stand in the spotlight. They are the ones who get to lead, and not merely play bit roles. For them, when they step into the ring, they get to be the headliners.

In real life, GLOW stood apart from the pack thanks to its particular focus on presenting women wrestlers as major talents. In this new series, GLOW looks outside of the ring at the impact of these women getting their chance to make something of their own and shine at a time when they were still being kept aside.

The Evolution of Harley Quinn: From Abuse Victim to Vivacious Anti-Hero

If one were to examine the numerous rogues galleries and collections of villains throughout comic books, it would be easy to say that Batman has one of the greatest rogues galleries in the realm of superhero stories. Over the years, plenty of memorable villains would arrive in the comics and capture the attention of readers. One of these villains, however, was a foe who had first appeared in the cartoon Batman: the Animated Series. That villain’s name is Harley Quinn. First appearing in the episode “Joker’s Favor” as a mere henchman, Quinn would grow in prominence with future appearances, becoming the right-hand woman of the Joker. However, something interesting began to happen when she began to appear in comics. She would not simply be limited to a villain that served the needs of another. Though she has not gone full-on hero, Harley Quinn has gone on to develop into more of an anti-hero. Not only that, she’s even grown to be able to stand on her own and not simply lean on the Joker. How did this happen? What was the path of evolution for her? Well, let us first begin with a graphic novel called Mad Love and the origin it presents for Quinn.

Once, Harley Quinn was better known by her real name of Dr. Harleen Quinzel. An aspiring psychologist, Harleen leapt at the opportunity to try to understand the criminal mind. Her subject: the Joker. Thus began their sessions at Arkham, with her trying to understand him. However, something began to happen. Harleen began to fall in love with him. She was twisted by his words, growing more and more attached to him while unaware of his manipulation. Eventually, she busted him out of Arkham Asylum. Not only that, she took his word about her name sounding like “harlequin” to heart. She got herself a harlequin costume and began calling herself Harley Quinn, becoming a major accomplice to the Joker. With that laid out, part of the appeal of the character does come through. Though she possesses a bubbly and fun personality, she is also a victim of abuse. Their relationship has no true tenderness to it, with the Joker treating her as nothing more than a tool for his schemes. The result is a tragic character lurking beneath the vim and vigor. However, Harley Quinn would not simply spend her time as a suffering pawn of the Joker. She would make a change that would expand her. She would get a friend, and that friend was Poison Ivy.

Poison Ivy is a character who serves as an excellent foil to Harley Quinn. Ivy is a character with a serious edge who hates men and their abuses, while Harley is a more easygoing character who was utterly obedient to the Joker. They were a comic match to be made, though certainly an odd couple pair. However, this pair helped Harley to grow as a character. Though she would have moments where she reverted when around the Joker, she began to take more stock in her self-worth. Her confidence grew as she hung around with Poison Ivy. This confidence and self-reliance would grow as she began to have her own adventures, even forming a team with Poison Ivy and Catwoman as the Gotham City Sirens. Throughout this time, Harley herself showed more initiative in turning over a new leaf, improving herself and even making parole. However, the next big step and current phase of Harley would not arise until a major event known as the New 52.

As part of the New 52’s new roll-out of comics, Harley Quinn received a new title of her own, one written by Amanda Conner and Jimmy Palmiotti. In this new series, Harley finds that an old patient of hers had a surprise set aside in their will: that Harley would gain ownership of an apartment building at Coney Island. Now serving as a landlord in Coney Island and as a member of a roller derby team, Harley seeks to improve her neighborhood and fight crime. No more is Harley Quinn just the abused pawn of the Joker. Now, she stands tall as an anti-hero, certainly just as quirky and rough as before but now saving lives from threats like a zombie outbreak or a super-strong sailor addicted to weird seaweed. Free from the shadows of Gotham, she blossoms as her own character, becoming an irreverent but good-hearted anti-hero. In a way, it is understandable how Harley Quinn could develop like she has. In the dark and shadowy world of Batman, she was a foe with a lighter personality than most that was twinged with tragic corruption and a good heart beneath. Now, written as more of an anti-hero, she stands out as a more irreverent face in the crowd among the many more serious-minded heroes of the DC Universe. In short, her quirky antics and gray yet benevolent morality stand out against the more black and white nature of the classic DC heroes and villains.

Ever since her first appearance on Batman: the Animated Series, Harley Quinn has grown fast in her popularity. Along with that growth has been a growth of character, evolving her from the abused pawn of the Joker into the quirky anti-hero that calls Coney Island her home.

Power Rangers: Solid Might and a Little Morphin’

In 1993, a new superhero series hit television that would strike like lightning in a bottle: Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers. Taking action footage from the Japanese Super Sentai series and mixing it with American footage and dubbing, the series captured the attention of viewers with its tale of five teenagers with attitude using martial arts and super powers to battle the forces of evil. The show’s mixture of martial arts action, giant monster battles, and somewhat cheesy teen stories landed it with a fanbase fast. In fact, the Power Rangers franchise has grown and the show persists to this day, with new variations and iterations to each new season. In fact, there have even been films of the Power Rangers. Most of those films, however, were specifically tied in with the television shows. Now, a new film has arrived to hit theaters. Though it draws its inspiration from the Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers television series, this new film serves as the start of potentially a new line in the Power Rangers franchise. Simply titled as Power Rangers, it proves to be a solidly entertaining new entry in the prolific franchise, avoiding certain pitfalls even as it does not rise to greatness.

In the town of Angel Grove, five teenagers come together in a moment of pure chance. Their names are Jason, Billy, Kimberly, Zack, and Trini, and they all have their frustrations and problems that plague their lives. One night, they all end up converging at the same location at a local gold mine. It is there that they discover something in the rocks: power coins. These coins grant them super strength, and inspires them to investigate further. What they find is even more amazing: an alien spaceship, buried deep in the ground. This ship is the home of an alien named Zordon, once a powerful warrior and member of the Power Rangers. He had set out the power coins long ago to find those who would be worthy to continue the mission of the Power Rangers and protect the Zeo crystals. Now, the Zeo crystals on Earth are threatened when Rita Repulsa returns, a former Power Ranger now seeking to collect the Zeo crystals for nefarious ends. These five teenagers must learn to work together and grow as a team, if they are to become the newest team of Power Rangers and stop Rita’s plans to summon a gigantic monster known as Goldar and bring destruction to the Earth.

This film makes for an entertaining new entry in to the Power Rangers franchise. Elizabeth Banks looks like she is having fun as she plays Rita Repulsa, delivering some menace along with a playful demeanor to show off the sadistic nature in this take on Rita. Likewise, Bryan Cranston delivers a solid, serious take as Zordon. He captures Zordon’s devotion to the mission of the Power Rangers, while tempering it with concern and frustration over having a group of teenagers become the newest members of this team. Along with that, the movie also delivers on some of the fun action that most people remember with the show. From battles with henchmen monsters known as Putties to a giant monster battle between Goldar and the Power Rangers’ giant robot the Megazord, the action fare which most people think of with Power Rangers is on display. Some viewers might be a little disappointed that the Power Rangers do not fully morph into their armor until around the last twenty minutes of the film. That said, the movie delivers more on an aspect of Power Rangers that some might not think about as much: the teenagers.

In the series Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers, the teens are a solid group of friends and general do-gooders. Though the characters are nice, the writing for that series tended to present them in the sort of shallow presentation from which a lot of teen-centered programming at the time suffered. They were heroes and had a few traits that helped them stand up, but they could come across as dull to some viewers. For the film Power Rangers, however, more time and development is given to the teens themselves. For instance, here they are portrayed as somewhat flawed but with heart beneath the cracks. For instance, the film’s version of Jason is a star football player who’s punished with weekly detention sessions after a failed attempt to prank a rival team, but he also stands up for Billy and protects him from bullies. Along with that, the teens are not presented as friends right away. Instead, their friendship develops over the course of the film as they share in the experience of becoming Power Rangers, growing past their labels and their issues along the way. In a way, the approach is essentially to take these teenagers and make them a sort of super-powered Breakfast Club. The result is a take on the team that can offer more substance beyond the original do-gooders from the television series. The writing for these characters might still potentially seem a little shallow, but it at least offers more meat to the characters and a bigger development to them as they rise up and take on the mantle of the Power Rangers.

Though the film might not be anything stellar, Power Rangers offers a take on the superhero franchise that is solidly entertaining. Good performances and a more developed take on the five teenagers with attitude help to give a concrete foundation for its entertainment. Besides, in the wake of bad movies based on similar nostalgic properties, isn’t there something to be said for competency?

Things I Can’t Explain: Growing Up Darling

Back in the early ’90s, Nickelodeon first began to explore having their own original live-action shows in their line-up, alongside their cartoons. Among these shows was a series known as Clarissa Explains It All. Starring Melissa Joan Hart, the series follows Clarissa Darling as she navigated the murky waters of adolescence. Along for the ride were her eccentric parents Janet and Marshall, her scheming little brother Ferguson, and her easy-going confidant Sam Anders. The series struck a chord with audiences, offering a fun take on a teen sitcom with a style that incorporated fourth-wall breaking and info graphics, while also dabbling in a subtle touch on more risque subjects like sex and teen partying. In fact, the show’s popularity even proved that a series with a female lead could garner a male audience, paving the way for numerous Nickelodeon shows which would be centered around female protagonists. In the many years since, the show’s creator Mitchell Kriegman has decided to revisit his old creation. In this case, it is not with a television series. Rather, it is with a novel. With his new novel Things I Can’t Explain, Kriegman gives a look at Clarissa’s life that feels like a natural progression from his show.

Though she has left her hometown in Ohio for the energy and excitement of New York City, Clarissa Darling is finding that life is not quite as understandable as she expected. Her parents are exploring the realm of a separation, an aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis. Her brother Ferguson is in prison, the result of insider trading and messing with Russian mob money. Even her dream of being a journalist has hit some snags, as newspapers have begun to fall out of prestige. Still, she has managed to find some positives. For instance, she finds herself with a golden opportunity at an internet news source known as Nuzegeek as a potential financial reporter. She has also met a local guy named Nick who shares a spark of desire with her. Unfortunately, even these perks have their hurdles. The financial editor is a snobbish jerk who looks down upon Clarissa, while Nick is plagued by a punk rocker ex-girlfriend who knows just how to sink her claws into him. That is not even mentioning Clarissa’s ex-boyfriend, a slacker named Norm who insists that they are still together. Even with all of life’s hard curve balls, Clarissa sets out to persevere and achieve her dreams.

Mitchell Kriegman’s new novel makes for a fun read. Even for those who might not have seen Clarissa Explains It All, the book works well in hooking readers with its world and characters. There is a sense of history to Clarissa, whether she is talking about her old newspaper internship or when she is hanging out with her group of friends. The lived-in sense is also complimented by the novel’s breezy prose, which does not drag on and allow the pages to flow by for the reader. The result is a novel that is easy to pick up and get into, something to enjoy. Now, there is the occasional reference or character that is made to be topical that comes off a little rough, such as a friend of Clarissa’s who speaks largely in abbreviated words. These moments come off as more stereotypical and cartoonish of current-day elements, but such lapses are generally outweighed by the positives over the course of the story. As for people who have seen Clarissa Explains It All, then the novel will make for a fun return for that familiar audience.

Even as the novel works for those who have not seen the original show, the novel works well as a continuation of Clarissa Explains It All. Stylistically, it carries over a lot of elements from the show. For instance, the info graphics return with their familiar appearance. The writing and presentation of Clarissa’s challenges are also akin to the approach to the show, which had a more irreverent take on teenage issues than most teen sitcoms of the time. That slight irreverence is now used to examine the hurdles of adulthood, from romantic relationships to workplace struggles. Along with that, other characters from the original series turn up. In addition to her family members, the book also explores the unsteady relationship history between Clarissa and her confidant Sam Anders, which traveled an unsteady path between friends and something more. In fact, that is part of what works well with this novel. It feels like a natural progression from the original series. The strengths of the show are allowed to bolster and develop, thanks to the room of a novel. It allows itself to explore more mature problems for this older audience, while still maintaining the spirit and voice that had made Clarissa Explains It All such a hit. In essence, the audience for the show has grown up, and Clarissa Darling has gotten the chance to keep up pace.

Back in the early ’90s, Nickelodeon had a hit on their hands when they began airing Clarissa Explains It All. Now, the show’s success is continued with Things I Can’t Explain, which ages up and tackles more adult issues while preserving the winning voice and spirit of the original show.