Tag: film

Invasion of the Body Snatchers: Remade, Regrown, Revitalized

If one were to bring up the subject of movie remakes, there generally tends to be a unifying call among people: no more. For most, a remake seems like a lazy attempt to cash in on a familiar name. It seems like it is a choice to avoid taking any risk on a new idea, instead retreading the familiar and potentially creating an inferior version of the same product. In truth, a remake is not an inherently bad prospect. True, sometimes it is done merely as an act of business by using that familiar name to get people into the theaters. However, a remake can result in something good. It could take a past film which had a good idea but flawed execution, and better realize its potential. It could expand and better showcase ideas hinted or suggested at with an earlier work. That is the case for one such remake. Back in 1956, a movie called Invasion of the Body Snatchers was released and became one of the sci-fi classics of its era, serving as an effective piece of anti-Communist (or anti-McCarthyist, depending on your interpretation) paranoia. Then, in 1978, it was remade, the result being a chilling tale that examines the subject through the lens of ’70s cynicism and “Me Decade” ideas.

In the city of San Francisco, Elizabeth Driscoll thinks that something is wrong. Her boyfriend, Geoffrey, has begun to act differently. He is colder, more distant to her. She turns to a colleague, Matthew Bendell, for help in trying to find out just what has happened. As they do, however, they discover something truly odd: duplicates seeming to form, baring a resemblance to people that they know and linked to a strange plant that has begun to pop up. As they try to understand this, they discover the truth: people are not who they seem. More and more people are being replaced with these alien copies when they fall asleep, the originals destroyed. It is not just normal people being replaced, either. This duplicates have infiltrated into positions of power, as well. Now, they seek to replace humanity and claim our world as theirs. With the threat of the world hanging in the balance, Elizabeth and Matthew set out to stop the spread of these duplicates. Of course, can they trust the people around them, or have they already fallen prey to the body snatchers?

This film is an example of a good remake. It takes the paranoia built into the core idea of people being replaced by emotionless copies and expands upon it with the execution. For instance, early in the film, most of the city is packed with the sort of natural noise that can arise from people rushing about. However, as more and more people are replaced, that ambient noise grows quieter. In addition, the performances of these copies are strong, delivering on a sense of otherness that make their detached attitudes all the more chilling. Along with that, the upgrade in effects better showcases aspects of the copying process that were merely hinted at in the original. For instance, the original film was somewhat limited in showing the copy development, mostly displaying opening pods and vaguely human forms in them. In this version, the copies grow and form through a stage of uncanny development, while the originals are leeched upon as they sleep. As for the destruction of the originals, their decayed and broken husks are a chilling portrayal of the end result of anyone copied by these body snatchers. Of course, effects are one thing. The bigger point, however, is in how this remake uses the idea of the body snatchers to explore its own avenue of thought.

While the original film was focused on fears of the 1950s, this iteration is rooted in concerns of the 1970s. For instance, the ’70s was a period of time sometimes regarded as the “Me Decade”, because the communal ideals of the ’60s gave way to self-centered pursuits concerning changing oneself. In essence, there was a shift from fixing society to fixing individuals. In this film, the aliens present their takeover as a better alternative to humanity’s natural state. They offer a world that is free from fear and hate…but also free from love. Thus, their takeover is presented almost as a chilling allegory about the temptation in changing oneself by essentially checking out of the big picture. Along with that, a distrust of government and authority festered into the 1970s. Situations like the Vietnam War and Watergate prompted a suspicion in the public about authority, and this film channels those concerns into the fears it presents. Elizabeth and Matthew do try to use the authorities to combat the spread of these body snatchers, but even the police and local government figures have been infiltrated by these aliens stalling their efforts. Even a self-help guru they turn to for assistance seems more like a modern-day snake oil salesman instead of a useful authority figure. Thus, this paranoia about alien invaders represents the era’s fears of those in power.

Though the idea of a movie remake may sound bad to the general public, a well-crafted remake can take the ideas of the original and deliver them with a new shine and skill. The 1978 version of Invasion of the Body Snatchers takes the core concept of an alien takeover with emotionless copies, but trades out the original film’s 1950s fears for an exploration of ’70s concerns.

Wonder Woman: Wonderful Idealism Versus Accepted Injustice

In the history of comics, there has been no female superhero that has had a lasting impact on popular culture quite like Wonder Woman. First created by William Moulton Marston back in 1941 as a hero who would fight with love rather than being solely focused on fighting, Wonder Woman has since become a major source of feminist inspiration. Skilled in the art of war but with a mission devoted to peace and love, she stands as one of DC Comics’s greatest heroes, right alongside Superman and Batman. However, even as she has her place in popular culture, Wonder Woman herself has not had a lot of material of her own outside of comic books. Aside from a 1970s television series that starred Lynda Carter and appearances in several cartoons concerning the Justice League, Wonder Woman has not had much to call her own. At long last, she finally has been brought to the big screen as part of the DC Cinematic Universe in her own film. Thankfully, the wait has been worth it. Wonder Woman captures the appeal of its hero, delivering not only on good action but also viewing her idealistic desire to help in the face of grim and commonplace evil.

On the island of Themyscira, the Amazons live hidden away from the rest of the world. Chief among them is Diana, princess and daughter of Queen Hippolyta. She yearns to live like the other Amazons and learn the ways of combat, something Hippolyta is hesitant about. Though she does give in and let Diana learn under the tutelage of their chief general Antiope, something arrives that shakes their peaceful existence: the accidental arrival of Steve Trevor, an American spy. He reveals that the world is consumed in the midst of the Great War, with millions suffering and dying. Believing that Ares (the God of War) is behind this wide-scale slaughter, Diana decides to leave her peaceful home behind so that she can get Steve back to his superiors and hunt down Ares. Thus, Diana finds herself in the world of mankind for the first time, encountering its very different ways. In particular, she finds herself confronted with the sorrows of war and the cruelty inflicted by people like the victory-obsessed General Ludendorff and the psychotic Dr. Poison. Still, even as the suffering seems so widespread and immeasurable, Diana will do what she can to battle against this injustice and bring peace back to mankind.

Wonder Woman’s first film of her own is a very good first entry. In the title role, Gal Gadot delivers an excellent job as Wonder Woman. She captures both the power that she delivers in her fight against evil, but also the heart that cares for people and seeks to bring peace. The rest of the cast also works well, in particular Chris Pine as Steve Trevor. He works as a nice complement and counterpoint to Wonder Woman, similarly wanting to bring peace but more beaten down by the war’s cruelty. As for the film itself, it delivers on plenty of elements. For instance, it is able to take Diana’s fish-out-of-water qualities and explore them for both serious and comedic elements, such as showing her serious condemnation of the war in a grave moment or playing with her reaction to societal gender views in a more comedic beat. Along with that, the film delivers on some very good action sequences. In particular, a sequence of Wonder Woman charging through No Man’s Land to save a village from potential destruction not only offers thrilling action as she battles against these military forces, but it also shows her actually being a hero and saving lives. In fact, that brings up a big and interesting point the film explores: her battle against banal evil.

Even though there are specific villains in the film like General Ludendorff and Dr. Poison, it almost feels as if the true enemy is that of banal evil. By this, I mean the cruelties and injustices that occur simply because people accept that is how things are. In the case of this film, it displays the cruelty of war as shown with its setting in World War I. It is widespread and awful, and it is not the sort of evil that can simply be extinguished by taking down one foe. Its sheer scope is enough to wear down most, such as Steve Trevor’s initial insistence on just sticking to a core mission. For Wonder Woman, however, each act of suffering she witnesses breaks her heart and she cannot simply stand by. She must battle this injustice. In turn, her courage in fighting this injustice inspires Steve Trevor and a band of other soldiers to aid her in this fight. True, this banal evil is widespread, even accepted by many as simply part of the more cruel part of mankind. However, Wonder Woman does not simply accept that cruel half. Sure, mankind has the potential for great suffering, but they also possess the capacity for great compassion and love. That is what she fights for, and that is what she stands for: a light of hope, beaming through the darkness of despair and cynicism.

Though the DC Cinematic Universe may have begun on rocky footing, it at last has a strong entry of its own with Wonder Woman. Not only is it a fun and thrilling ride, it captures the spirit of its hero well with her battle against the banal evils of wartime.

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2: Playing the Hits

Who would have thought that the Guardians of the Galaxy would become as popular as they are now? First created back in 1969 with a different line-up in an alternate timeline of the Marvel Universe, the team is one that had languished in the halls of obscurity. Even a more recent version of the team (created in 2008) set in the main Marvel Universe was still pretty little-known. It is this newer team, though, that would serve as the basis for the hugely successful film Guardians of the Galaxy. Under director James Gunn’s vision, the film was an irreverent spin in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, packing the humor with heart in its off-beat characters and packing an excellent soundtrack. Audiences fell in love with the film and its characters, an impressive thing for such odd characters as Rocket (a bipedal violent raccoon) and Groot (a walking, talking tree-being with limited linguistics). Now, the goodwill generated with this irreverent romp has translated into hype for its sequel, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2. Indeed, it delivers on that hype by bringing the humor and heart back in spades, even if this film might be slightly lesser than the first one.

After having taken down Ronan the Accuser and saving the planet Xandar from potential destruction, Star-Lord and the Guardians of the Galaxy have now become heroes. More specifically, they have become heroes for hire, offering their services in exchange for a paycheck. Their newest mission had added some danger to their lives, though. It has made them enemies of the Sovereign, a race of genetically engineered beings who consider themselves superior to all others. In trying to escape the Sovereign, though, they cross paths with a more surprising character: Ego, a Celestial who claims to be the father of Star-Lord. Wary of his claims, Star-Lord decides to learn from Ego about the truths of his origins and the incredible power he just might possess. Unfortunately, Sovereign have not given up their hunt for the Guardians. In fact, they have hired the Ravagers, a gang of criminals and thieves, to hunt them down and bring them back for execution. Now, the clock is ticking as the Ravagers come calling and Star-Lord sets out to learn his real parentage, though there may be darker secrets lurking in this pursuit.

As I mentioned, the film is really good, but potentially a bit lesser than the first film. Before I go into my main complaints, though, it is worth noting that the film does deliver on a lot of the strengths from the first film. The humor is still as irreverent as ever, with the laughs landing from broad moments and well-crafted character interactions. That irreverence also shines in how much the film is willing to embrace and run with the craziness that can arise in the cosmic side of Marvel comics, whether featuring cameos from characters like Howard the Duck or featuring kooky concepts like a “quantum asteroid field”. As for the villains, they make for a stronger, more interesting batch of foes than the straight-faced and generic nature of Ronan. For instance, some of the villains have a more humorous touch to them, allowing them to more naturally fit within the tone that the Guardians of the Galaxy films possess. For example, the Sovereign make their claims of being superior to other races and that they seek to achieve their own perfection, but they act like spoiled petulant jerks when things stop going their way. Of course, not everything hits and lands with quite the same impact as the first film.

Though this film has plenty that is good, it feels a bit more unfocused than the previous entry. The multiple plots in the first film were woven together well, kept united in the central issue of a powerful orb and the threat it might possess were it to end up in the wrong hands. For the sequel, however, its multiple plots feel much more separate and only fully tying in once the movie’s gears start turning to the climax. Though there is great character development that unfolds in each of these plot strands, the result is that it still ultimately feels a bit unfocused. In addition, there are a few moments when the irreverence sometimes lands a bit hollow. It is not often, but there is the odd moment when a joke lasts a bit too long or an ’80s pop culture reference feels a little forced. That said, the movie is still ultimately a fun ride. The same heart and sense of fun that were in the first film are on full display here. In fact, because it is passed having to introduce these heroes, the film is able to delve more into their cores and develop them further. It is mostly a case of a few small flaws in an otherwise enjoyable movie.

Sometimes, rich fodder can be mined from the halls of obscurity. The first Guardians of the Galaxy film proved that by delivering on engaging characters and an irreverent sense of fun, and Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 maintains that shining quality, even if there may be a small flaw or two.

The Freshman: Big Clown on Campus

In the world of silent movies, typically there are a few familiar names that come up and stick from that era of filmmaking. For most, they are apt to think of Charlie Chaplin. That is understandable, considering his impact as one of the earliest worldwide film stars and the inventive comedy he presented with his signature character, the Tramp. For others, they may think of Buster Keaton. This is also understandable, considering his own somewhat cynical sense of humor and masterful deadpan presence. However, there is one star from this era that I feel should not be forgotten: Harold Lloyd. During the 1920s, Harold Lloyd was one of the most successful comedic stars on the silver screen. His work was characterized by its elaborate stunts, lengthy chase sequences, and his “Glasses” character archetype: a young go-getter seeking a better life and the chance to get the girl. However, his name slipped into obscurity, as his great work became eclipsed by the genius of Chaplin and Keaton in the public eye. Nowadays, though, there has been a renewed interest in Lloyd’s work, with the Criterion Collection re-releasing his movies on DVD and Blu-Ray. Among these films is The Freshman, a top-notch comedy that may have sparked the trend of college comedies.

Harold Lamb is a young man who is excited for the opportunity to go to college. With his spot at Tate University secured, Harold dreams of the chance to become the Big Man on Campus, beloved by all. However, he is a bit of a nerd, drawing his inspiration on how the Big Man should act thanks to novel and a film called “The College Hero”. This gets the attention of a upper-year cad and his cruel classmates, who decide to take advantage of Harold’s naivete while mocking him behind his back. However, there is one girl who can see the truth of him: Peggy,  a young woman working in her mother’s boardinghouse and at the local Hotel Tate. She sees the sincerity and charm in his nerdy demeanor, even as others deride him. However, his quest to become popular finds a real challenge when he seeks to join the college football team, believing that to be the key to becoming the Big Man on Campus. Will he has his winning moment at the big game, or will he find that the path to popularity is more treacherous than it looks?

Even for a film that was made back in 1925, The Freshman is still a delight to watch. The story moves along at a brisk pace, but does not lose sight of the characters or heart. The performers do a good job of communicating their feelings or emotions in each moment, while the intertitles cover whatever dialogue is necessary and occasionally get in an additional joke. Along with that, the film finds plenty of ways to mix its major comedic scenes into advancing the plot. For instance, one sequence later in the film has Harold hosting the Fall Frolic as part of his plan to become the Big Man on Campus. Unfortunately, his meager finances mean that he is stuck with a suit has been barely basted. The result is that Harold desperately attempts to keep the suit together as he mingles and mixes with the other students, even as each dance threatens to pop every stitch and button clean off. The sequence is a fun one with plenty of good gags, but it also works as a major moment of Harold facing the real cruelty of his students. Of course, that also goes into part of what works with Harold Lloyd’s films: their optimism and heart.

Chaplin and Keaton, though they were both geniuses from the silent era, had characters who were outsiders. They were figures that could examine the weaknesses in society, get knocked around as they attempted to navigate its choppy waters, then drift off into the sunset when they were through. Harold Lloyd’s characters, however, were not the same outcasts. They were everymen, young go-getters who sought to improve their lives. Sure, they may stick out with some eccentricities, such as the nerdy Harold Lamb and his basing cool behavior on stuff from books and movies. However, the characters at their core wanted to be liked or to have their share of success, a feeling I am sure is shared by many. He crafted these figures and, even as they would be put through the wringer in his delightful comedic sequences, they would keep up the fight until they achieved their dreams. That drive, mixed with the heart and charm that Lloyd had put into his performances, created a more relatable figure for his audiences. In short, he gave them an underdog they could root for. In a way, it is thus understandable how he could become such a huge success.

Though Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton are the names most think of with silent film comedy, Harold Lloyd should not be so easily forgotten. As seen with The Freshman, his well-crafted gags and charming characters helped to make movies that can still be appreciated even today.

Your Name.: Love in the Time of Body Swaps

Over the ages, as many different stories have been written, certain tropes for whole plots have begun to emerge. For instance, there is the “Deal with the Devil” plot, which always centers around an individual making a corrupt bargain with a malevolent force, often with a terrible price paid. Another is the “Going Native” plot, which follows an individual finding themselves among a different culture, then siding with that culture and fighting against that which they once were. The focus for this review, though, is a trope I will call the “Body Swappers” plot. This trope is centered around two or more people finding themselves in each other’s bodies, usually through some mystical force or advanced science. Generally, these sorts of stories involve the participants gaining a greater understanding and respect for each other. Now, while these sorts of plots may be familiar, what gives them their spark is in how they are used and executed. For instance, the “Body Swappers” plot is the basic idea at play in the novel Your Name., which has now been adapted into an anime film by director Makoto Shinkai. Under his direction, the film is a lovely romance that uses the “Body Swappers” plot to develop its characters and cast a light on the changes on Japan.

Taki is a teenage boy living in Tokyo who deals with the constant hustle and bustle as he juggles school and work. Mitsuha is a teenage girl living in a small rural town, bored with her country life and frustrated with her politician father. One morning, a surprise greets them both: they awaken in the other’s body. It seems be to random as to whenever they wake up in the other’s body, and once they return to their own, the memories of their experiences begin to fade away like a dream. Stuck in this rather odd situation, the two try to maneuver through it the best that they can. They leave notes for the other to communicate and advise them on how to act. They try to help the other out as they navigate the hurdles and challenges. The more that they learn of each other, though, the more that they begin to fall in love with each other. Eventually, they seek a way to get past these barriers and finally meet each other face to face…before they potentially forget each other and lose this tender connection.

This new project by Makoto Shinkai is a delightful little movie. The animation is gorgeous, capturing a realistic aesthetic that is balanced by the magical components of the story. Whether it is the modern buildings of Tokyo or the lush forest near Mitsuha’s small town, the quality of detail in the animation is great. The quality of that animation also extends to the actions of the characters. It is not just the strong voice acting that goes to show whenever one person is in the other’s body. The swap is also demonstrated through the little gestures and movements of Taki and Mitsuha. For instance, Mitsuha tends to carry herself with a more careful and submissive air, while Taki can be more proactive and prone to reacting to any slights against him. The body language they sport, even as they try to maintain the other’s normal life, help to reveal just who is in possession of a body at any time. Of course, it is not just the quality of the animation that makes this such a good film. It is also in the story and writing, which offers a fresh feel to a familiar plot trope.

Most of the time, whenever a “Body Swappers” plot is used, it is generally to show two characters coming to learn more about the other and having a greater respect for them. In this case, the film takes this familiar plot and uses it as an inspired approach for a romance. As both Taki and Mitsuha live through days in each other’s lives, they see the worlds they live in and fall for each other in the process. Along with that, they also grow more as individuals thanks to the experiences that they share. Taki begins to see more value in having a cooler head and not just instinctively reacting, while Mitsuha begins to develop more of a spine and stand up for herself. This body swap does not just take advantage of examining the differences between these two characters, though. It also casts a light on the changes in Japan. While Taki spends his days in the hustle and bustle of Tokyo, Mitsuha’s small town lacks a lot of those modern features while holding on to older traditions. In fact, Mitsuha and her sister perform rituals at a local shrine, led by her grandmother who seeks to preserve these parts of the past. These two perspectives serve as a nice way to showcase these two sides of Japan: the ancient cultures and traditions that have been a part of the nation throughout the ages, and the technological landscape that has grown in recent years.

Through the years, many familiar forms of plots have grown and developed. By using the familiar “Body Swappers” plot and applying it to a love story, Your Name. breathes new life by using it to explore self-growth through a shared experience.

The Evolution of Harley Quinn: From Abuse Victim to Vivacious Anti-Hero

If one were to examine the numerous rogues galleries and collections of villains throughout comic books, it would be easy to say that Batman has one of the greatest rogues galleries in the realm of superhero stories. Over the years, plenty of memorable villains would arrive in the comics and capture the attention of readers. One of these villains, however, was a foe who had first appeared in the cartoon Batman: the Animated Series. That villain’s name is Harley Quinn. First appearing in the episode “Joker’s Favor” as a mere henchman, Quinn would grow in prominence with future appearances, becoming the right-hand woman of the Joker. However, something interesting began to happen when she began to appear in comics. She would not simply be limited to a villain that served the needs of another. Though she has not gone full-on hero, Harley Quinn has gone on to develop into more of an anti-hero. Not only that, she’s even grown to be able to stand on her own and not simply lean on the Joker. How did this happen? What was the path of evolution for her? Well, let us first begin with a graphic novel called Mad Love and the origin it presents for Quinn.

Once, Harley Quinn was better known by her real name of Dr. Harleen Quinzel. An aspiring psychologist, Harleen leapt at the opportunity to try to understand the criminal mind. Her subject: the Joker. Thus began their sessions at Arkham, with her trying to understand him. However, something began to happen. Harleen began to fall in love with him. She was twisted by his words, growing more and more attached to him while unaware of his manipulation. Eventually, she busted him out of Arkham Asylum. Not only that, she took his word about her name sounding like “harlequin” to heart. She got herself a harlequin costume and began calling herself Harley Quinn, becoming a major accomplice to the Joker. With that laid out, part of the appeal of the character does come through. Though she possesses a bubbly and fun personality, she is also a victim of abuse. Their relationship has no true tenderness to it, with the Joker treating her as nothing more than a tool for his schemes. The result is a tragic character lurking beneath the vim and vigor. However, Harley Quinn would not simply spend her time as a suffering pawn of the Joker. She would make a change that would expand her. She would get a friend, and that friend was Poison Ivy.

Poison Ivy is a character who serves as an excellent foil to Harley Quinn. Ivy is a character with a serious edge who hates men and their abuses, while Harley is a more easygoing character who was utterly obedient to the Joker. They were a comic match to be made, though certainly an odd couple pair. However, this pair helped Harley to grow as a character. Though she would have moments where she reverted when around the Joker, she began to take more stock in her self-worth. Her confidence grew as she hung around with Poison Ivy. This confidence and self-reliance would grow as she began to have her own adventures, even forming a team with Poison Ivy and Catwoman as the Gotham City Sirens. Throughout this time, Harley herself showed more initiative in turning over a new leaf, improving herself and even making parole. However, the next big step and current phase of Harley would not arise until a major event known as the New 52.

As part of the New 52’s new roll-out of comics, Harley Quinn received a new title of her own, one written by Amanda Conner and Jimmy Palmiotti. In this new series, Harley finds that an old patient of hers had a surprise set aside in their will: that Harley would gain ownership of an apartment building at Coney Island. Now serving as a landlord in Coney Island and as a member of a roller derby team, Harley seeks to improve her neighborhood and fight crime. No more is Harley Quinn just the abused pawn of the Joker. Now, she stands tall as an anti-hero, certainly just as quirky and rough as before but now saving lives from threats like a zombie outbreak or a super-strong sailor addicted to weird seaweed. Free from the shadows of Gotham, she blossoms as her own character, becoming an irreverent but good-hearted anti-hero. In a way, it is understandable how Harley Quinn could develop like she has. In the dark and shadowy world of Batman, she was a foe with a lighter personality than most that was twinged with tragic corruption and a good heart beneath. Now, written as more of an anti-hero, she stands out as a more irreverent face in the crowd among the many more serious-minded heroes of the DC Universe. In short, her quirky antics and gray yet benevolent morality stand out against the more black and white nature of the classic DC heroes and villains.

Ever since her first appearance on Batman: the Animated Series, Harley Quinn has grown fast in her popularity. Along with that growth has been a growth of character, evolving her from the abused pawn of the Joker into the quirky anti-hero that calls Coney Island her home.

Power Rangers: Solid Might and a Little Morphin’

In 1993, a new superhero series hit television that would strike like lightning in a bottle: Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers. Taking action footage from the Japanese Super Sentai series and mixing it with American footage and dubbing, the series captured the attention of viewers with its tale of five teenagers with attitude using martial arts and super powers to battle the forces of evil. The show’s mixture of martial arts action, giant monster battles, and somewhat cheesy teen stories landed it with a fanbase fast. In fact, the Power Rangers franchise has grown and the show persists to this day, with new variations and iterations to each new season. In fact, there have even been films of the Power Rangers. Most of those films, however, were specifically tied in with the television shows. Now, a new film has arrived to hit theaters. Though it draws its inspiration from the Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers television series, this new film serves as the start of potentially a new line in the Power Rangers franchise. Simply titled as Power Rangers, it proves to be a solidly entertaining new entry in the prolific franchise, avoiding certain pitfalls even as it does not rise to greatness.

In the town of Angel Grove, five teenagers come together in a moment of pure chance. Their names are Jason, Billy, Kimberly, Zack, and Trini, and they all have their frustrations and problems that plague their lives. One night, they all end up converging at the same location at a local gold mine. It is there that they discover something in the rocks: power coins. These coins grant them super strength, and inspires them to investigate further. What they find is even more amazing: an alien spaceship, buried deep in the ground. This ship is the home of an alien named Zordon, once a powerful warrior and member of the Power Rangers. He had set out the power coins long ago to find those who would be worthy to continue the mission of the Power Rangers and protect the Zeo crystals. Now, the Zeo crystals on Earth are threatened when Rita Repulsa returns, a former Power Ranger now seeking to collect the Zeo crystals for nefarious ends. These five teenagers must learn to work together and grow as a team, if they are to become the newest team of Power Rangers and stop Rita’s plans to summon a gigantic monster known as Goldar and bring destruction to the Earth.

This film makes for an entertaining new entry in to the Power Rangers franchise. Elizabeth Banks looks like she is having fun as she plays Rita Repulsa, delivering some menace along with a playful demeanor to show off the sadistic nature in this take on Rita. Likewise, Bryan Cranston delivers a solid, serious take as Zordon. He captures Zordon’s devotion to the mission of the Power Rangers, while tempering it with concern and frustration over having a group of teenagers become the newest members of this team. Along with that, the movie also delivers on some of the fun action that most people remember with the show. From battles with henchmen monsters known as Putties to a giant monster battle between Goldar and the Power Rangers’ giant robot the Megazord, the action fare which most people think of with Power Rangers is on display. Some viewers might be a little disappointed that the Power Rangers do not fully morph into their armor until around the last twenty minutes of the film. That said, the movie delivers more on an aspect of Power Rangers that some might not think about as much: the teenagers.

In the series Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers, the teens are a solid group of friends and general do-gooders. Though the characters are nice, the writing for that series tended to present them in the sort of shallow presentation from which a lot of teen-centered programming at the time suffered. They were heroes and had a few traits that helped them stand up, but they could come across as dull to some viewers. For the film Power Rangers, however, more time and development is given to the teens themselves. For instance, here they are portrayed as somewhat flawed but with heart beneath the cracks. For instance, the film’s version of Jason is a star football player who’s punished with weekly detention sessions after a failed attempt to prank a rival team, but he also stands up for Billy and protects him from bullies. Along with that, the teens are not presented as friends right away. Instead, their friendship develops over the course of the film as they share in the experience of becoming Power Rangers, growing past their labels and their issues along the way. In a way, the approach is essentially to take these teenagers and make them a sort of super-powered Breakfast Club. The result is a take on the team that can offer more substance beyond the original do-gooders from the television series. The writing for these characters might still potentially seem a little shallow, but it at least offers more meat to the characters and a bigger development to them as they rise up and take on the mantle of the Power Rangers.

Though the film might not be anything stellar, Power Rangers offers a take on the superhero franchise that is solidly entertaining. Good performances and a more developed take on the five teenagers with attitude help to give a concrete foundation for its entertainment. Besides, in the wake of bad movies based on similar nostalgic properties, isn’t there something to be said for competency?